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Ireland: 31 Days, 31 Pictures: Day 31- Saint Nahi’s Church & Central Mental Hospital

Wow, I can’t believe I have come to the end of my marathon 31-day blogging effort! I have absolutely adored reliving my 2017 trip through this series of blog posts. I hope you have enjoyed coming along on the ride with me, and that you have learned all about Ireland through pictures!

For my final post, I thought I would share THREE images. The first is Saint Nahi’s Church, an 18th-century church in Dundrum, an area of Dublin about a half hour drive from the city centre.

Saint Nahi’s Church

The name Taney derives from Tigh Naithi meaning the house or place of Nahi, and who may also be associated with Tobarnea, a seashore well that near Blackrock. The current church is still in use by the local Church of Ireland community and is one of two churches in the Parish of Taney (historically encompassing the whole area around Dundrum). It is built on the site of an early Irish monastery founded by Saint Nahí.

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St. Nahi’s stands on the grounds of the original monastery, having been refurbished several times, most recently in 1910, after a period when it was in use as the local boys’ national school. Following storm damage to the roof, a major refurbishment was carried out by the then Rector of the Parish, Canon William Monk Gibbon (father of the poet of the same name), who is buried in the grounds of the church.

Central Mental Hospital

I chose Dundrum as my location for my final three days in Ireland because of it’s proximity to Central Mental Hospital. Strange, I know, but I was interesting in researching the facility for my book.

The Central Mental Hospital is a mental health facility housing forensic patients. It is, along with a community day centre for out patients at Usher’s Island, part of the National Forensic Mental Health Service. This service is in turn part of the Irish prison system providing psychology, therapy, social work, medicine and nursing. The central hospital itself contains 84 patient beds.

The hospital began in 1850 as Central Criminal Lunatic Asylum for Ireland and was the first secure hospital in Europe. This was an early move of an ideological initiative throughout Britain and its colonies which included the building of the infamous Broadmoor Hospital in England. The site was originally chosen to be soothing to mental health patients and was intentionally not linked to any particular prison service to maintain distinction between criminality and illness.

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Ireland: 31 Days, 31 Pictures: Day 3- Hard Rock Cafe Dublin

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Day #3: Hard Rock Cafe- Dublin

Of course, you have to take a picture!

After having finally found the elusive Kevin Street Garda Station just before dusk on my third night in Ireland, I was making the long walk back to my AirBnb accommodation on the other side of the River Liffey when I stumbled across the Hard Rock Cafe, situated amidst the bustling nightlife of Temple Bar.

Hard Rock offers classic American food, served in a rock’n roll atmosphere. The emphasis is on being friendly and relaxed while providing all customers with excellent service.

Hard Rock Cafes pride themselves on their individual collections of memorabilia and, in Dublin, you will find, amongst other items, a pair of Bono’s sunglasses and a pair of Paul McCarthney’s ‘Beatle’ boots!

The cafe menu includes burgers, nachos, bruchetta and quesadilla – casual, American-style dining.

A range of merchandise is also available to purchase, many designs unique to the Dublin outlet.

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Ireland: 31 Days, 31 Pictures: Day 2- St Patrick’s Cathedral

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Day #2 St Patrick’s Cathedral

St Patrick’s Cathedral is close to the famous Temple Bar and Guinness Storehouse. I was on this side of the River Liffey on my third day in Dublin, in search of the Kevin Street Garda Station as part of my book research efforts.

Saint Patrick’s Cathedral has been part of Ireland’s history for over 800 years and today is one of the most popular visitor attractions in Dublin. Built in honour of Ireland’s patron saint between 1220 and 1260 Saint Patrick’s Cathedral offers visitors a rich and compelling cultural experience and is one of the few buildings left from medieval Dublin. It is the National Cathedral of the Church of Ireland and is the largest Cathedral in the country. Jonathan Swift, author of Gulliver’s Travels, was Dean of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in the 1700s and he is one of many burials on site. The Cathedral is world famous for its choir which still performs daily during school term and in recent years the Lady Chapel, dating from 1270, has been restored to its original glory and a new exhibition called Lives Remembered has opened which includes a specially commissioned tree sculpture and marks the centenary of World War 1. Guided tours of the Cathedral happen regularly throughout the day or a free App can be used for self-guide purpose.