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What’s The Best Crime Fiction Book You’ve Ever Read?

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo.

Share yours in the comments!

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So What Now?

July 20th marked the end of Paid To Dance, a book series I had been working on since 2016. It is the end of an era, but I am ready to close the book on this particular chapter (pardon the pun) and get started on something fresh.

I’m going to take it easy for the rest of 2018. It has been a big year and a relentless rollercoaster past four months in particular. Every area of my life has been touched: my work, my health, my friends and family.

I never thought I would take a ‘break’ from writing and publishing, but for some time I’ve increasingly feeling the need to pause.

I have pushed through the challenges determined to stay on track with my writing, publishing, marketing and promotion, trying to maintain consistent with my blog and a number of social media platforms. I want to take some time to review my strategies, to ensure I’m making the most of these platforms and not wasting time.

There are some pressing non-writing matters that are increasingly demanding my attention. Since leaving my full-time job last year my attention has been reduced from all things creative to merely surviving. But I don’t want to just survive anymore. I need to re-establish stability so that I can properly focus on my passion again.

So I’m going to take a break, until mid-late September, at least. I’m not going to stop writing completely- I simply can’t. I’m just going to take a step back from blogging and social media. I will try and keep up my daily writing inspiration posts if I can.

I’m not going to be launching any new books in 2018, however I am going to republish all of my short stories that I had as individual Kindle ebooks, that were deleted last year when my Kindle publishing account was shut down. I may even pop a few new ones up there

For the remainder of the year I’m going to work on getting the first of my Irish crime novels finished. This series is my ‘life’s work’, my passion project, the books I was born to write. I’m also going to make a start a collection of women’s intrepid travel stories.

I want to take this opportunity to sincerely THANK everyone who is coming along on this writing journey with me, as fellow writers and readers, likers and sharers. Your support means the world to me, and I hope that by taking this little breather, I can come back bigger and better.

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Ireland: 31 Days, 31 Pictures: Day 31- Saint Nahi’s Church & Central Mental Hospital

Wow, I can’t believe I have come to the end of my marathon 31-day blogging effort! I have absolutely adored reliving my 2017 trip through this series of blog posts. I hope you have enjoyed coming along on the ride with me, and that you have learned all about Ireland through pictures!

For my final post, I thought I would share THREE images. The first is Saint Nahi’s Church, an 18th-century church in Dundrum, an area of Dublin about a half hour drive from the city centre.

Saint Nahi’s Church

The name Taney derives from Tigh Naithi meaning the house or place of Nahi, and who may also be associated with Tobarnea, a seashore well that near Blackrock. The current church is still in use by the local Church of Ireland community and is one of two churches in the Parish of Taney (historically encompassing the whole area around Dundrum). It is built on the site of an early Irish monastery founded by Saint Nahí.

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St. Nahi’s stands on the grounds of the original monastery, having been refurbished several times, most recently in 1910, after a period when it was in use as the local boys’ national school. Following storm damage to the roof, a major refurbishment was carried out by the then Rector of the Parish, Canon William Monk Gibbon (father of the poet of the same name), who is buried in the grounds of the church.

Central Mental Hospital

I chose Dundrum as my location for my final three days in Ireland because of it’s proximity to Central Mental Hospital. Strange, I know, but I was interesting in researching the facility for my book.

The Central Mental Hospital is a mental health facility housing forensic patients. It is, along with a community day centre for out patients at Usher’s Island, part of the National Forensic Mental Health Service. This service is in turn part of the Irish prison system providing psychology, therapy, social work, medicine and nursing. The central hospital itself contains 84 patient beds.

The hospital began in 1850 as Central Criminal Lunatic Asylum for Ireland and was the first secure hospital in Europe. This was an early move of an ideological initiative throughout Britain and its colonies which included the building of the infamous Broadmoor Hospital in England. The site was originally chosen to be soothing to mental health patients and was intentionally not linked to any particular prison service to maintain distinction between criminality and illness.