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Books By The Beach: Asha’s Story Part Two at Kirra Beach

Welcome to Kirra Beach, the second last stop on my Books By The Beach tour! It is hard to believe it is almost over!

The small rocky headland Kirra Point separates Kirra Beach to the north and Coolangatta Beach to the south, and is noted as one of the world’s premier surf breaks. In the past the surf break was known for producing high quality barrels. Today sand pumping across the Tweed River has filled it in and changed its character.

The Quiksilver Pro, an event on the World Surf League, is often contested at Kirra when the surf is not contestable at Coolangatta.

 

There’s variations on what the word Kirra actually means, but some believe Queensland Aborigines named it after a boomerang. Which makes sense as Kirra wraps evocatively around the bend separating Coolangatta and Kirra beaches and in front of Kirra Hill. Surfers flock to Kirra bend for its world-class breaks, and Kirra has also hosted the Quiksilver and Roxy Pro surfing competitions.

One of the Gold Coast’s most laid-back beach destinations, the suburb is home to Kirra Surf, which surfers consider the one-stop shop for surf gear. Like it’s neighbouring Tugun, Kirra is not a place you’ll find glitz and glamour, with plenty of weatherboard beach shacks still standing among the burgeoning apartment scene. The iconic Kirra Beach Hotel has been trading for more than 50 years.

In this post I am sharing with you my book Paid To Dance: Asha’s Story Part Two.

Three years after daringly stepping into the world of stripping, Asha has left The Runway, the club that made her an exotic dancer, to make a fresh start at at rival venue Mademoiselle’s. Here she is faced with a whole new set of challenges, including an interstate adventure to Melbourne’s glamorous strip club scene. Asha’s personal and professional lives collide in unexpected ways, in the lead-up to the grande finale of her stripping adventure.

PLEASE NOTE: At the end of this video there is information about purchasing the Paid To Dance books on Amazon/Kindle. My books are not currently available on Amazon/Kindle. Instead you can download a free PDF of the first chapter of Asha’s Story Part Two HERE: Paid To Dance Asha’s Story Part Two excerpt

Sexy Womanh hold hands and fingers on legs in fishnet stocking posing

I hope you have enjoyed your time with me here at Kirra Beach. Last stop- Coolangatta!

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Books By The Beach: Stripping Past & Present at Tugun Beach

Welcome to Tugun, the twelfth stop on my Books By The Beach tour!

Over the hill from Currumbin, Tugun is north-west of Coolangatta and 96 kilometres (60 mi) south of Brisbane, the state capital of Queensland. Tugun is a popular holiday destination, with a number of holiday units and motels lining Tugun Beach, its homey streets playing host to cafés and fish and chip shops. There are also has a number of shops located on its Golden-Four Drive strip.

Tugun

 

This is the Gold Coast without the glitz. Locals fondly call Tugun, Tugz (pronounced choo-gs). It’s joined to its neighbouring suburbs of Currumbin and Bilinga via the Gold Coast Oceanway.

Its name is believed to have derived from an Indigenous word of unknown dialect meaning “breaking waves”.

In 1898, the Farrell family walked overland from Tallebudgera Township along a track now called Simpson Road, to their block of land or selection just south of Currumbin Hill. They established a camp site there and started to clear some land for a home and grazing paddocks for their small dairy herd. The local Aboriginal people often bartered fish and crabs with the Farrells, supplementing the settlers’ diet when times were lean.

Over the creek, known today as Flat Rock Creek, and to the north-west of Currumbin Hill, another Irish family, the Mitchells had settled on their block a few weeks after the arrival of the Farrell family. At first, there was a degree of rivalry between the two families based partly on old country loyalties – the Mitchells were from the north of Ireland, the Farrells from the south.

However, years spent pioneering the land and the experience of isolation meant that inevitably the families became the firmest of friends.

The first home in Tugun village was built in 1916. The construction of a coastal road linking Southport to Coolangatta in the 1920s was a major achievement for the Main Roads Commission. The age of the mass-produced motor car provided the impetus for developing beach properties and accommodation facilities in areas such as Tugun and Bilinga.

The dairy and banana farms however, which dated from the early years, disappeared as the land was subdivided into areas such as the Currumbin Estates in the late 1950s.

In this post I will be delving a little deeper into the Paid To Dance series, and telling you all about the first installment, Paid To Dance: stripping Past & Present.

Paid To Dance: Stripping Past & Present is a comprehensive insight into the stripping industry, from its origins to its modern day evolution. Everyday women share stories of working in gentleman’s clubs, paying their way through university, funding travel and even escaping homelessness and crime. Parents and partners offer intriguing perspectives of their loved one’s occupation, and a manager shares his experiences overseeing the operations of a real gentleman’s club.

Paid To Dance looks inside the trials and tribulations of exotic dancers throughout history into the present day, and explores a livelihood that is often rewarding and always challenging.

What readers had to say about Paid To Dance:

“Wow! What a fantastic read! This book gives the reader such an interesting insight into the lives of strippers… and it’s not just reading their side of it.. but those people around them too.. their parents, partners, and even from a venue manager who does the hiring. Once I started reading I could not put it down.. as I wanted to know how everyone around them felt.. as I found this very interesting after only really knowing the strippers side of it. The history was also excellent and I enjoyed reading about the past and different cultures.”
Barbara, Gold Coast, Australia

“A most enjoyable easy read, lots of interesting facts and is light hearted on a subject that society still sees as taboo. Would highly recommend this book to any interested in the behind the scene in this industry.”
Sharon, Gold Coast, Australia

“The author gives a truthful, unbiased and non-judgemental insight into exotic entertainment industry complete with real stories from real people. Great read for anyone who’s ever been curious about what’s really going on behind the scenes in adult entertainment clubs and in the lives of exotic dancers.”
Julia, Brisbane, Australia

“A book I could not put down. A really interesting read into the lives of women in an industry that many of us no nothing about. Highly recommended.”
Sarah, Brisbane, Australia

“This book has opened my eyes to the lives of strippers and dancers, exceptionally well written and researched. Very much worth the read and I recommend it to all ages enabling a clear and concise understanding of the lives of these ladies.”
Jackee, Brisbane, Australia

PLEASE NOTE: At the end of this video there is information about purchasing the Paid To Dance books on Amazon/Kindle. My books are not currently available on Amazon/Kindle. Instead you can read a FREE PDF Excerpt HERE:

Paid To Dance Stripping Past and Present

Cover Image Book 1 Edited

I hope you have enjoyed your time here with me at Tugun, and I hope you will join me next time at Bilinga. Only three stops to go!

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From The Outside Looking In: Paul, The Customer

I was twenty-one years old celebrating a friend’s eighteenth birthday in Brisbane when I visited my first gentlemen’s club. I kept coming back because it was just like hanging out at a pub with mates, but with a much nicer view. My regular venue introduced poker nights, but I was going in for weekly drinks after work well before that started.

To quote the TV show ‘Cheers’, a good gentleman’s club experience is where everybody knows your name. Where the dancers are not too pushy, and in turn are not pressured by management to hustle.

Part of the relationship that appeals to a customer, especially a regular one, is the individuality of a particular dancer. Sometimes they just need to spend that little bit of extra time sitting and talking, and when a hostess or manager pounces on the dancer and tries to speed up the booking process, it could potentially undermine the dancer’s efforts.

Managers should coach the girls, but not shoo them on from a customer because he hasn’t bought a dance within three minutes. Not every guy will book in that short amount of time.

For me to book a private dance, there obviously has to be some kind of physical attraction between the dancer and me. It’s nice when a girl has put some thought into her presentation, but being a Barbie Doll isn’t what it’s all about for me either. I need to have a connection with her. I’ve booked big girls, skinny girls, redheads, blondes and brunettes. I don’t have a particular ‘type’, but the one thing they have all done is taken their time and shared with me a bit of their personality.

I like talking to the dancers, but if one were to approach me and say, “Hi my name is such and such, do you want to go for a dance?” that would help me make up my mind pretty much straight away not to book her. That might work in some places and with some people, but I like it when the girl has some rapport. I want to be able to relax and spend my money at my leisure.

Just as it would be for a dancer coming from a customer, body odour and bad breath have got to be the worst turn-offs when interacting with a dancer. Excessive bad language is another one. We all swear but every second word is certainly not attractive.

Also, if a dancer speaks badly about other girls in order to make herself look more appealing, it only reflects badly on her. I might be fond of the girl she is talking about, and she would lose my business as a result of bad mouthing.

It’s perfectly okay to be having a bad day, but I don’t want to feel obliged to spend money on a dancer out of guilt. It’s not very appealing to book her when she is moping around, and it’s especially de-motivating when the dancer complains about how poorly she has been earning.

Some dancers don’t talk to couples that come into the club, but I strongly encourage it, even so much going the extra mile to focus on the female first. Try to make her night as much fun as her partner’s. If you get a positive result, then work on the guy.

Couples go into clubs to explore something new and exciting together, and dancers can earn double the money if they secure a booking with two people. Coming from a personal standpoint, my visiting clubs has had only a positive effect on my relationship with my wife, who has become quite the regular customer herself!

From watching the dancers in their element, I have had the opportunity to observe and learn a lot about how the girls work. They work the room from the stage, and pick up on who’s watching them. They make eye contact and go to those people when they come off stage.

Girls, if you sit in the corner and expect a customer to come to you, you might be waiting awhile. Even if you’ve done the rounds and no-one’s biting, go sit with someone who’s previously acknowledged you, or who you think might be interesting and have a chat.

Obviously start with the ones that tipped you, but at least introduce yourself to the others and mention that you’ll come back and have a chat later. People love talking about themselves and if they enjoy your company, you’ll probably at least get your next drink bought for you, a tip or maybe even that dance they said no to earlier. Most customers will be willing to reward your time in one way or another.

If you are a customer at a club, the girls don’t have to be at your beck and call and they certainly don’t have to accept your dance. If you’re going to behave like a douche then expect to be left alone. Realise the girls need to make money and they do not get paid to simply be there at the club. If you have no intention of tipping or booking them, let them go on their way when they want to, and don’t make them feel bad about it. No tips or dances means no money for them, and many clubs charge the girls a door fee just so they can work. So if you’re not planning to book a dance just yet, be upfront about it. The girls will appreciate your honesty and may even decide to keep you company for a little longer anyway.

A lot of clubs take a cut of the girl’s tips if you give them the money on the floor. So if you want to tip her, check to see when she’s going on stage next. In saying that, if you’re sitting in a designated tipping area around the stage, expect to be asked to tip them. Premium viewing should pay a premium price and you could be costing the dancer money by taking up a seat from someone who wants to tip.

The dancers that work in the clubs provide entertainment and in turn create a bit of a fantasy world. The girls are definitely brave, and on more than one occasion I’ve suggested to a heckler that if they think they can do a better job, then they should get up on the stage themselves!

Sexy Womanh hold hands and fingers on legs in fishnet stocking posing

Paid To Dance: Asha’s Story Part Two is AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER in paperback and Kindle eBook for release WORLDWIDE on July 20th, 2018.

US: https://amzn.to/2MstBPb

UK: https://amzn.to/2KpEKQ9

CANADA: https://amzn.to/2tKXna6

AUS: https://amzn.to/2yODFAb