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Books By The Beach Concludes At Coolangatta/Greenmount!

HOORAY!!

We made it to Coolangatta, the last stop on my Books By The Beach tour!

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Thank you SO MUCH for coming on this epic journey with me, and I hope that you have enjoyed seeing and learning about all of the beautiful Gold Coast beaches I have visited along the way! I have certainly learned so much on this journey about the place I call home!It was a wonderful experience, but was not without its challenges, the most common ones being contending with the natural elements e.g. wind, and trying to find a quiet spot to film, especially at the most popular tourist spots like Burleigh. Where the wind wasn’t too strong, the sun wasn’t too glary or the shade too dark. But it was all part of the adventure, and I am so grateful to be able to say I have visited so many of the beaches here in the fantastic city where I live!

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When I filmed this series in mid-2018 I was living in Broadbeach (as I mention in the Broadbeach video). However some significant life changes and upheavals delayed the publishing of this series, and I have since relocated to beautiful Coolangatta, where I conclude the series.

Coolangatta is situated on the beach between the rock headlands of Point Danger, Greenmount and Kirra. It is the southernmost suburb of the City of the Gold Coast, and is named after the schooner Coolangatta, which was wrecked here in 1846.

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View of the Gold Coast skyline

From here, you can look back towards the Gold Coast skyline in the distance and the entire coastline. The surf here is spectacular, particularly off the northern corner of Coolangatta Beach, the headland around Greenmount, Snapper Rocks into the southern corner of Rainbow Bay and of course, the world-class surf break of Duranbah.

Coolangatta marks the southern end of the strip of surfing beaches that runs from the Queensland / New South Wales State Border north to Main Beach. The Gold Coast Airport, formerly known as Coolangatta Airport, is located at Coolangatta, with some of the runway going across the border into New South Wales.

Coolangatta and is a ‘Twin Town’ with our immediate neighbour Tweed Heads in New South Wales. I live right on the Queensland side of the state border- if you cross the street outside my place, you’re in New South Wales!

Duranbah and Tweed Heads sit around the corner from Coolangatta, but technically that’s New South Wales. Technicalities aside, visitors flock to the border town of Coolangatta for its change of pace. Due to the summer time difference with Tweed Heads, we get to celebrate New Years twice!

Having lived in the bustling inner-city area of Broadbeach, the laidback lifestyle we enjoy here in ‘Cooly’ is much more my style!

This suburb exudes an old-school beachside charm. Each June, Coolangatta hosts the Cooly Rocks On Festival, a two-week 1950s and 1960s nostalgia festival with free entertainment and attractions, including hot rods, restored cars and revival bands playing music of the era.

 

Greenmount
Looking back at Greenmount from Rainbow Bay
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View of Rainbow Bay and Snapper Rocks from Greenmount Hill

greenmount-1.jpgA lovely walking trail wraps around Greenmount Hill connecting Greenmount Beach to Rainbow Bay from which you can head up the hill to Point Danger. Both Greenmount Hill and Point Danger are great vantage points for whale watching.

 

Cooly Pt Danger
View of Snapper Rocks from Point Danger

 

D’Bah, as locals call it, is the one place you can be guaranteed of a swell when the rest of the coast is quiet. Meanwhile, the corner of Greenmount offers a protected spot for a swim.

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View of Duranbah Beach, or ‘D-Bar’, from Point Danger
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Duranbah Beach
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Duranbah Beach and Point Danger

Coolangatta hosts many sporting events including The Coolangatta Gold, one of the premier events in the sport of Ironman (surf lifesaving), as well as prolific surfing competitions the Quicksilver Pro and Roxy Pro.

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Coolangatta Gold surf lifesaving event

Every afternoon I walk from Coolangatta Beach up around Greenmount, along Rainbow Bay to Snapper Rocks, where I love to sit and watch the sunset. I’ve also been lucky enough to spot dolphins swimming by on a number of occasions!

 

Rainbow Bay
View of Rainbow Bay from Snapper Rocks
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Afternoon surfers at Snapper Rocks
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Waves crashing at Snapper Rocks

I also love to go walking up Greenmount and Point Danger, and if I’m feeling extra energetic, I’ll walk down the other side of Point Danger to Duranbah Beach.

In this final video, I’m reflecting back over all the beaches that I have visited, and all the books and stories I have shared with you. I hope you have enjoyed reading them.

I am working on setting up my titles through IngramSpark. In the meantime, I do have copies of The Wilted Rose and Paid To Dance: Stripping Past & Present available in paperback. If you live in Australia, I am able to post these to you. Please get in touch with me via the Contact page of this site to organise payment and delivery.

Thank you SO MUCH for coming on this epic journey with me! Keep an eye out here for many more adventures on the Gold Coast!

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Books By The Beach: Asha’s Story Part One at Bilinga Beach

Welcome to Bilinga, the thirteenth stop on my Books By The Beach tour!

Bilinga is close to the Queensland/New South Wales border to the west and has the Pacific Ocean to the east.

Bilinga

The word ‘Bilinga’ is derived from the word ‘Bilinba’, meaning ‘bats’. The name was adopted in 1918 as a place name for Crown lands north of Coolangatta.

Bilinga was located on the Nerang-Tweed Railway line and, after the Crown Land auctions, a rail siding was approved for the site in 1919. By 1923 the nucleus of settlement had formed when Percy Henzel opened a general store near the rail siding.

By the late 1920s, the new coastal motor road improved access to the area for holiday makers and residents.

The drowning of a man on Bilinga Beach in 1937 led to the establishment of the Bilinga Surf Lifesaving Club in 1938.

The Gold Coast Airport is located in Bilinga. Despite being situated in Bilinga and across the border into Tweed Heads West, New South Wales, the airport is also known as Coolangatta, presumably because Coolangatta is better known than Bilinga.

In this post I will be sharing with you about Asha’s Story Part One, the second installment in the Paid To Dance series.

Inspired by a true story, Paid To Dance: Asha’s Story Part One tells of one young woman’s experience working as an exotic dancer in Brisbane, Australia. After a shaky transition into the workforce, eighteen-year-old Asha Graham takes a job at The Runway, a prestigious gentlemen’s club in Brisbane City. During the first two years of a five year journey, Asha’s life is changed in a number of ways, as she learns the ropes and adapts to the often harsh conditions of her chosen profession.

PLEASE NOTE: At the end of this video there is information about purchasing the Paid To Dance books on Amazon/Kindle. My books are not currently available on Amazon/Kindle. Instead you can download a free PDF of the first chapter HERE:

Paid To Dance: Asha’s Story Part One- Chapter One

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I hope you have enjoyed your time here in Bilinga with me. Only two more stops to go! See you next time at Kirra Beach!

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Books By The Beach: Stripping Past & Present at Tugun Beach

Welcome to Tugun, the twelfth stop on my Books By The Beach tour!

Over the hill from Currumbin, Tugun is north-west of Coolangatta and 96 kilometres (60 mi) south of Brisbane, the state capital of Queensland. Tugun is a popular holiday destination, with a number of holiday units and motels lining Tugun Beach, its homey streets playing host to cafés and fish and chip shops. There are also has a number of shops located on its Golden-Four Drive strip.

Tugun

 

This is the Gold Coast without the glitz. Locals fondly call Tugun, Tugz (pronounced choo-gs). It’s joined to its neighbouring suburbs of Currumbin and Bilinga via the Gold Coast Oceanway.

Its name is believed to have derived from an Indigenous word of unknown dialect meaning “breaking waves”.

In 1898, the Farrell family walked overland from Tallebudgera Township along a track now called Simpson Road, to their block of land or selection just south of Currumbin Hill. They established a camp site there and started to clear some land for a home and grazing paddocks for their small dairy herd. The local Aboriginal people often bartered fish and crabs with the Farrells, supplementing the settlers’ diet when times were lean.

Over the creek, known today as Flat Rock Creek, and to the north-west of Currumbin Hill, another Irish family, the Mitchells had settled on their block a few weeks after the arrival of the Farrell family. At first, there was a degree of rivalry between the two families based partly on old country loyalties – the Mitchells were from the north of Ireland, the Farrells from the south.

However, years spent pioneering the land and the experience of isolation meant that inevitably the families became the firmest of friends.

The first home in Tugun village was built in 1916. The construction of a coastal road linking Southport to Coolangatta in the 1920s was a major achievement for the Main Roads Commission. The age of the mass-produced motor car provided the impetus for developing beach properties and accommodation facilities in areas such as Tugun and Bilinga.

The dairy and banana farms however, which dated from the early years, disappeared as the land was subdivided into areas such as the Currumbin Estates in the late 1950s.

In this post I will be delving a little deeper into the Paid To Dance series, and telling you all about the first installment, Paid To Dance: stripping Past & Present.

Paid To Dance: Stripping Past & Present is a comprehensive insight into the stripping industry, from its origins to its modern day evolution. Everyday women share stories of working in gentleman’s clubs, paying their way through university, funding travel and even escaping homelessness and crime. Parents and partners offer intriguing perspectives of their loved one’s occupation, and a manager shares his experiences overseeing the operations of a real gentleman’s club.

Paid To Dance looks inside the trials and tribulations of exotic dancers throughout history into the present day, and explores a livelihood that is often rewarding and always challenging.

What readers had to say about Paid To Dance:

“Wow! What a fantastic read! This book gives the reader such an interesting insight into the lives of strippers… and it’s not just reading their side of it.. but those people around them too.. their parents, partners, and even from a venue manager who does the hiring. Once I started reading I could not put it down.. as I wanted to know how everyone around them felt.. as I found this very interesting after only really knowing the strippers side of it. The history was also excellent and I enjoyed reading about the past and different cultures.”
Barbara, Gold Coast, Australia

“A most enjoyable easy read, lots of interesting facts and is light hearted on a subject that society still sees as taboo. Would highly recommend this book to any interested in the behind the scene in this industry.”
Sharon, Gold Coast, Australia

“The author gives a truthful, unbiased and non-judgemental insight into exotic entertainment industry complete with real stories from real people. Great read for anyone who’s ever been curious about what’s really going on behind the scenes in adult entertainment clubs and in the lives of exotic dancers.”
Julia, Brisbane, Australia

“A book I could not put down. A really interesting read into the lives of women in an industry that many of us no nothing about. Highly recommended.”
Sarah, Brisbane, Australia

“This book has opened my eyes to the lives of strippers and dancers, exceptionally well written and researched. Very much worth the read and I recommend it to all ages enabling a clear and concise understanding of the lives of these ladies.”
Jackee, Brisbane, Australia

PLEASE NOTE: At the end of this video there is information about purchasing the Paid To Dance books on Amazon/Kindle. My books are not currently available on Amazon/Kindle. Instead you can read a FREE PDF Excerpt HERE:

Paid To Dance Stripping Past and Present

Cover Image Book 1 Edited

I hope you have enjoyed your time here with me at Tugun, and I hope you will join me next time at Bilinga. Only three stops to go!